mythandrists:

1. Anyone who says “write what you know” either doesn’t know what they’re talking about or doesn’t know how to form a sentence. Know what you write. Do your research, but don’t think that just because you haven’t done your research yet doesn’t mean you’re not qualified to write about whatever you want. Don’t pigeonhole yourself. Pigeonholing sounds like a bad sex position, anyway.
2. Write badly. Write terribly, obnoxiously, fearlessly, write complete garbage, write melodrama, write too many details and extra scenes you’re going to have to cut later. Here’s a secret: Everyone’s first draft is shit. Yes, even Kerouac - have you read On the Road? Give yourself permission to suck. Write badly on purpose, but write badly in the way only you can write badly. Revision is for final drafts, not first drafts.
3. Semicolons are beautiful, but only if you actually know how to use them. Learn how to use them. Then use them. Don’t let your creative writing professor tell your that your poetry looks like an essay when you use actual punctuation; your creative writing professor is not you. Your creative writing professor doesn’t know what he’s talking about.
4. Except that your creative writing professor does know what he’s talking about. Listen to him. Learn from him. Write down all his advice in your notebook, but when it comes time to start writing - close the notebook.
5. Write every day.
6. But if you don’t write every day, don’t beat yourself up about it. Don’t beat yourself up, period. Self-loathing is antithetical to writing, unless you’re Gerard Manley Hopkins, but trust me, you don’t want to live the way Hopkins lived.
7. Stop thinking so damn much. Blare the music when you write; sit in a crowded coffee shop; drink; let yourself go. The first draft doesn’t want to be constrained; the first draft wants to be put on the page. The first draft wants a word count, not a rubric.
8. You’re always allowed to slam the door on someone who’s distracting you from your writing. Unless that person is a tax collector or your mother. Never slam a door on your mother unless she’s a drunk.
9. Everything has been done before. Get over it.
10. Love what you do. If you burn out, if you don’t love it anymore, either quit or find a way to love it again. Don’t do it for anyone else - no one’s paying you to be a writer. Pay yourself. Pay yourself in interesting characters and immersive plots and worlds you wish you could play around in. Give your writing to yourself. Treat it like a gift from you to you, because if you don’t love your final draft, no one else will, either.

mythandrists:

1. Anyone who says “write what you know” either doesn’t know what they’re talking about or doesn’t know how to form a sentence. Know what you write. Do your research, but don’t think that just because you haven’t done your research yet doesn’t mean you’re not qualified to write about whatever you want. Don’t pigeonhole yourself. Pigeonholing sounds like a bad sex position, anyway.

2. Write badly. Write terribly, obnoxiously, fearlessly, write complete garbage, write melodrama, write too many details and extra scenes you’re going to have to cut later. Here’s a secret: Everyone’s first draft is shit. Yes, even Kerouac - have you read On the Road? Give yourself permission to suck. Write badly on purpose, but write badly in the way only you can write badly. Revision is for final drafts, not first drafts.

3. Semicolons are beautiful, but only if you actually know how to use them. Learn how to use them. Then use them. Don’t let your creative writing professor tell your that your poetry looks like an essay when you use actual punctuation; your creative writing professor is not you. Your creative writing professor doesn’t know what he’s talking about.

4. Except that your creative writing professor does know what he’s talking about. Listen to him. Learn from him. Write down all his advice in your notebook, but when it comes time to start writing - close the notebook.

5. Write every day.

6. But if you don’t write every day, don’t beat yourself up about it. Don’t beat yourself up, period. Self-loathing is antithetical to writing, unless you’re Gerard Manley Hopkins, but trust me, you don’t want to live the way Hopkins lived.

7. Stop thinking so damn much. Blare the music when you write; sit in a crowded coffee shop; drink; let yourself go. The first draft doesn’t want to be constrained; the first draft wants to be put on the page. The first draft wants a word count, not a rubric.

8. You’re always allowed to slam the door on someone who’s distracting you from your writing. Unless that person is a tax collector or your mother. Never slam a door on your mother unless she’s a drunk.

9. Everything has been done before. Get over it.

10. Love what you do. If you burn out, if you don’t love it anymore, either quit or find a way to love it again. Don’t do it for anyone else - no one’s paying you to be a writer. Pay yourself. Pay yourself in interesting characters and immersive plots and worlds you wish you could play around in. Give your writing to yourself. Treat it like a gift from you to you, because if you don’t love your final draft, no one else will, either.

crypticink:

bluekomadori:

The tutorial of how I achieve watercolor effect in Sai! :) I highly recommend using real watercolor paintings (your own or ones found on the internet) as reference.

And here you can find a few useful links: 

  1. You can download the Sai file of this picture here: link 
  2. Video process of painting another picture: link
  3. The old watercolor tutorial: link
  4. Sai brushes (none of them is made by me) link + file you need to open them in Sai: link
  5. Awesome watercolor brushes made by Kyle T Webster: link

Here’s the finished painting: link

I want to try this!

adhdotlexia:

cookiekhaleesi:

the mortal parents and their demigod babies

negligent

negligent

dead

negligent and dead

dead

abusive and dead

practically perfect in every way

abusive and dead #2

eicinic:

alchemistkeyblademaster:

lesreichenbachfinn:

feardubh:

When people turn to fictional characters, it’s often because they want an escape. The stories of these people shelter us from the storm of our daily lives; they save us, if only for a little while. But when we really give in, become invested, let ourselves be vulnerable, something changes. We begin to feel that we know them. It’s no longer just an escape, but part of us, something that makes us who we are.

These characters teach us that incredible adversity can be overcome. That people can love each other forever. That life can be an adventure. That magic can be real. And even if these miracles have never happened to us, we begin to go through life believing that, someday, they could.

“And I promise you that you’re important. Don’t look at me like that- in all my 900 years I’ve never met someone who wasn’t important.”

“Cheer up mate, it gets better. Look at me, I was once a little kid living under the stairs. You’ll do fine.”

“Hey. I know it seems like life sucks, that you’ve got the devil on your tail. Hell, sometimes you do. But you’re strong enough to beat him. You’ve got friends at your back and family too, and that’s what really counts in the end.”

“Don’t be silly, they’re wrong about you; of course you matter. You’ve always mattered.”

WOW CONGRATS YOU JUST MADE ME CRY OVER MY OWN POST

I AM LITERALLY CRYING

Totally agree with this 

(Source: romangodfrey)

(Source: timelordgifs)

(Source: datasoriku)

(Source: ithelpstodream)

crimical:

duolingo // learn languages for free
rhymezone // type in a word and find words that rhyme
onelook // reverse dictionary
hemingwayapp // check your essay for readability
thesaurus // find synonyms, antonyms and more
planetebook & gutenberg // free ebooks
coursera // free online courses
realtimeboard // a virtual pinboard
pianotte & imslp // free piano sheet music
tunefind // find songs used in movies and tv shows
tothebestof // listen to the top 10 songs of any band or musical artist
omgcatz // download 8tracks playlists
tags.goose // mass tumblr tag replacer
colorpicker // helps you choose #hex colours
wordmark // helps you decide on fonts from your computer
iemoji // copy+paste tool for ios emojis on browsers
simpledesktops & subtlepatterns // simple desktop backgrounds
fount // identify fonts on websites
dafont & googlefonts // places to find lots of fonts
wigflip // pixel speech bubble generator
myfridgefood // check what stuff you have in your fridge and get some recipe ideas
roadtrippers // tool to plan a roadtrip across america
recitethis // turn a quote into a masterpiece
letterboxd // organize the movies you’ve watched, loved and plan on watching
soundrown // listen to various calming sounds

crimical: